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The VanGeet Off-Grid House

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The Van Geet home near Denver, Colorado, demonstrates
the successful integration of energy conservation measures and
renewable energy supply in a beautiful, comfortable, energyefficient,
295-m2 (3,176-ft2
) off-grid home in a cold, sunny
climate. Features include a tight envelope, energy-efficient
appliances, passive solar heating (direct gain and Trombe wall),
natural cooling, solar hot water, and photovoltaics. In addition
to describing this house and its performance, this paper
describes the recommended design process of (1) setting a goal
for energy efficiency at the outset, (2) applying rules of thumb,
and (3) using computer simulation to fine-tune the design.
Performance monitoring and computer simulation are
combined for the best possible analysis of energy performance.
In this case, energy savings are estimated as 89% heating and
cooling, 83% electrical, and nearly 100% domestic water
heating. The heating and cooling energy use is 8.96
kJ/Cdaym2
(0.44 Btu/Fdayft2
).

Citation Formats

paulnorton.net. (2016). The VanGeet Off-Grid House [data set]. Retrieved from https://data.openei.org/submissions/5461.
Export Citation to RIS
Norton, Paul, Norton, Paul. The VanGeet Off-Grid House. United States: N.p., 22 Sep, 2016. Web. https://data.openei.org/submissions/5461.
Norton, Paul, Norton, Paul. The VanGeet Off-Grid House. United States. https://data.openei.org/submissions/5461
Norton, Paul, Norton, Paul. 2016. "The VanGeet Off-Grid House". United States. https://data.openei.org/submissions/5461.
@div{oedi_5461, title = {The VanGeet Off-Grid House}, author = {Norton, Paul, Norton, Paul.}, abstractNote = {The Van Geet home near Denver, Colorado, demonstrates
the successful integration of energy conservation measures and
renewable energy supply in a beautiful, comfortable, energyefficient,
295-m2 (3,176-ft2
) off-grid home in a cold, sunny
climate. Features include a tight envelope, energy-efficient
appliances, passive solar heating (direct gain and Trombe wall),
natural cooling, solar hot water, and photovoltaics. In addition
to describing this house and its performance, this paper
describes the recommended design process of (1) setting a goal
for energy efficiency at the outset, (2) applying rules of thumb,
and (3) using computer simulation to fine-tune the design.
Performance monitoring and computer simulation are
combined for the best possible analysis of energy performance.
In this case, energy savings are estimated as 89% heating and
cooling, 83% electrical, and nearly 100% domestic water
heating. The heating and cooling energy use is 8.96
kJ/Cdaym2
(0.44 Btu/Fdayft2
). }, doi = {}, url = {https://data.openei.org/submissions/5461}, journal = {}, number = , volume = , place = {United States}, year = {2016}, month = {09}}

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Data from Sep 22, 2016

Last updated Sep 22, 2016

Submitted Sep 22, 2016

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Paul Norton

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Paul Norton

paulnorton.net

Paul Norton

paulnorton.net

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