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Hathaway Solar Patriot house

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This Dataset contains field research raw data, analysis spreadsheet, photos, and final report from the Hathaway Solar Patriot House Building America Case Study project.

This dataset details the monitored and modeled performance of a solar home outside of Washington, D.C. We modeled the home energy performance using DOE2.2, performed numerous short-terms tests on the home, and monitored its occupied performance for 29 months. The home used modular construction, solar water heating, a ground-coupled heat pump, efficient appliances, and compact fluorescent lighting to reduce its energy consumption by 35% compared to the Building America research benchmark home. The addition of 6kW of photovoltaics (PV) increased the savings to 67% compared to the Building America research benchmark. A more efficient shell to reduce space conditioning loads would have brought the home closer to its zero energy goals. However, even with efficient lighting and appliances, the lights, appliance and plug loads were a significant energy consumer. About 4 kW of PV was required to meet the needs of these loads alone. To achieve the zero energy goal with no further efficiency increases, the Hathaway house would need about 2.6 kW of PV in addition to the 6.0 kW it now has. Applying advanced efficiency measures available or being developed, such as heat-recovery ventilation, superinsulation, and electrochromic windows, could reduce the heating, cooling, and domestic hot water (DHW) energy use to less than 1700 kWh per year, an 88% reduction in these loads from the Building America Benchmark. At this efficiency level, the appliance and plug loads come to dominate energy consumption and account for nearly 70% of the total energy use. This analysis points out that even with highly effective energy-savings technologies (pushed beyond levels currently practical), whole-house energy use reduction by efficiency measures is only about 60% without also reducing the energy use of appliances and plug loads largely considered outside the designers jurisdiction.

Citation Formats

paulnorton.net. (2016). Hathaway Solar Patriot house [data set]. Retrieved from https://data.openei.org/submissions/4985.
Export Citation to RIS
Norton, Paul, Hancock, Ed, Barker, Greg, and Reeves, Paul. Hathaway Solar Patriot house. United States: N.p., 20 Jun, 2016. Web. https://data.openei.org/submissions/4985.
Norton, Paul, Hancock, Ed, Barker, Greg, & Reeves, Paul. Hathaway Solar Patriot house. United States. https://data.openei.org/submissions/4985
Norton, Paul, Hancock, Ed, Barker, Greg, and Reeves, Paul. 2016. "Hathaway Solar Patriot house". United States. https://data.openei.org/submissions/4985.
@div{oedi_4985, title = {Hathaway Solar Patriot house}, author = {Norton, Paul, Hancock, Ed, Barker, Greg, and Reeves, Paul.}, abstractNote = {This Dataset contains field research raw data, analysis spreadsheet, photos, and final report from the Hathaway Solar Patriot House Building America Case Study project.

This dataset details the monitored and modeled performance of a solar home outside of Washington, D.C. We modeled the home energy performance using DOE2.2, performed numerous short-terms tests on the home, and monitored its occupied performance for 29 months. The home used modular construction, solar water heating, a ground-coupled heat pump, efficient appliances, and compact fluorescent lighting to reduce its energy consumption by 35% compared to the Building America research benchmark home. The addition of 6kW of photovoltaics (PV) increased the savings to 67% compared to the Building America research benchmark. A more efficient shell to reduce space conditioning loads would have brought the home closer to its zero energy goals. However, even with efficient lighting and appliances, the lights, appliance and plug loads were a significant energy consumer. About 4 kW of PV was required to meet the needs of these loads alone. To achieve the zero energy goal with no further efficiency increases, the Hathaway house would need about 2.6 kW of PV in addition to the 6.0 kW it now has. Applying advanced efficiency measures available or being developed, such as heat-recovery ventilation, superinsulation, and electrochromic windows, could reduce the heating, cooling, and domestic hot water (DHW) energy use to less than 1700 kWh per year, an 88% reduction in these loads from the Building America Benchmark. At this efficiency level, the appliance and plug loads come to dominate energy consumption and account for nearly 70% of the total energy use. This analysis points out that even with highly effective energy-savings technologies (pushed beyond levels currently practical), whole-house energy use reduction by efficiency measures is only about 60% without also reducing the energy use of appliances and plug loads largely considered outside the designers jurisdiction.}, doi = {}, url = {https://data.openei.org/submissions/4985}, journal = {}, number = , volume = , place = {United States}, year = {2016}, month = {06}}

Details

Data from Jun 20, 2016

Last updated May 23, 2022

Submitted Jun 20, 2016

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paulnorton.net

Contact

Paul Norton

Authors

Paul Norton

National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Ed Hancock

Mountain Energy Partnership

Greg Barker

Mountain Energy Partnership

Paul Reeves

Partnership for Resource Conservation

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